Wednesday, June 3, 2009

A Bird in the Hand

A too-stuffed pine siskin.




Mike and the siskin strike a pose.

The pine siskins love us and need to be with us. They love us so much they eat everything we put out for them. This makes them full and dopey and easy prey for any prowling puss.

This little fellow was too full to fly so my husband picked him up and minded him for a bit until he could muster the gumption to take wing.

Soon the young 'uns will be out and eating and they are much too trusting. We'll be doing a fair bit of bird-minding before the summer's out.


22 comments:

the Bag Lady said...

The birds are very lucky to have you and Mike looking out for them! Birds are smart that way, I guess.

Leah J. Utas said...

We are their featherless, unwinged slaves.

Barbara Martin said...

Birds know instinctively who will take care of them.

I have lovebirds and senegals to care for, though one of the lovebirds, an escape artist, bemoans to me to remove the clip on his door. Reiki (his name) when allowed out tends to go too close to the senegals' cages where danger of the worst sort awaits.

Perhaps for your wild friends you might put out less food.

Leah J. Utas said...

I guess they know a soft touch, Barbara.

We could put out less food, but we know they'd be beaking down the doors to get at it.

Reb said...

That is pretty silly of a bird to stuff itself so it can't fly - good thing you guys are there for them.

Leah J. Utas said...

I suspect birds don't give it much thought, Reb.

Hilary said...

You're good folk - you and Mike. That's a great photo of a handsome creature.. and of the pine siskin too. ;)

Leah J. Utas said...

Thanks, Hilary. I'll pass the compliment on.

Crabby McSlacker said...

Cute bird and, um, I must say, cute hubby too!

Leah J. Utas said...

Crabby, thank you so much. It'll make his day.

Missicat said...

awwww!!! Lucky little birds to have the two of you.

Leah J. Utas said...

Thanks. Missicat. We are their slaves.

Lover of Life said...

Ohhhh how beautiful of you both to do that! What a picture - the powerful man and the helpless, trusting little bird. Very very sweet.

Leah J. Utas said...

Lover of Life, thank you. Those little guys trust us to be good to them. They make us happy by visiting.

Miz said...

Birds know instinctively who will take care of them.

I wonder is that true? it totally makes sense as I think we as humans do as well...if we stop and listen to our guts & are operating from a place of self love.

Leah J. Utas said...

MizFit, I wish everyone would listen to their instinct instead of their raw emotions, or ruthless logic for that matter.

Frank Baron said...

Good for you and Mike! I get Siskins at my feeder but haven't noted them gorging themselves flightless. I'll keep an extra sharp eye out now, though. Cute little beggars ain't they?

Leah J. Utas said...

Frank, you've got to keep an eye on the little fellows. They'll eat everything in sight and beak at you until you put out more.

Cute is what keeps us serving them.

Thomma Lyn said...

Oh, how precious -- so sweet that you're looking after the beautiful little birds, and I love the pictures of Mike holding one of them! :)

LOL @ "featherless, unwinged slaves!"

Leah J. Utas said...

Thanks, Thomma Lyn. We do as we can. Mike is very fond of birds. He often puts them up high on top of the shed so they can sleep it off.

Clare2e said...

Adorable! We just saw this bit of developed bird behavior in a fast food parking lot in Massachusetts. A sparrow lit onto the drivers side mirror. My husband thought he was waiting for a french fry. After he flew off disappointed, he went to another mirror, waited patiently while that window was rolled down inches away from him. Then, out came a fry that he snagged and flew away with.

I don't believe this is the ideal everyday diet for anyone really, but to see the sparrows (and the thieving starlings on the perimeter) having learned to work the mirror trick was amazing. Very smart indeed!

Leah J. Utas said...

That is very smart. It's probably lousy for their diets, but it's still smart.